Flower named after charity worker with Covid-19

  • Published
Margie Blyth holds a babyImage source, Family handout
Image caption,
Margie Blyth worked at the North East Autism Society for 18 years

An autism charity has named a flower after a dedicated worker who died after contracting coronavirus.

Margaret Blyth, a mother of two known as Margie, worked for the North East Autism Society for 18 years before her death in April.

A newly cultivated geranium grown at a farm run by the charity has been named Margie Blyth in her honour.

Her son Jon said Ms Blyth, 66, from Sunderland, loved flowers and it was a "beautiful tribute".

Image source, North East Autism Society
Image caption,
The geranium has been grown at a farm run by the charity

'She loved flowers'

The main plant is to be given to Ms Blyth's family while 11 cuttings will have "pride of place" in the charity's various locations where she worked.

Mr Blyth said: "The family are really touched.

"It's a beautiful tribute and it means her memory will be around forever.

"She loved flowers and would have loved to know this had happened."

The orange and pink geranium was cultivated by horticultural experts at New Warlands Farm, at Burnhope.

Image source, North East Autism Society
Image caption,
Ian Patterson, programme manager at the farm, said the new geranium was a lovely flower

Ian Patterson, programme manager at the farm, said: "It's a really lovely flower and we all thought it was a nice way to remember her.

"She was such a great character - if you asked her to do something, she just got on and did it. She's a big miss for everyone."

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