Investigation reopened into Sunderland man's death

David Hall Mr Hall was last seen on 5 August 1987

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North Yorkshire Police have reopened an investigation into the death of a Sunderland man whose body was found 18 years ago.

David Hall, 26, was reported missing from his home in August 1987. His body was found five years later by forestry workers in woodland near Stokesly.

Mr Hall's cause of death could not be established and an open verdict was recorded at an inquest.

Police said they wanted closure for Mr Hall's family.

Det Ch Insp Nigel Costello, who is leading the investigation, said the force wanted to find out how Mr Hall died and why his body came to be in a forest 40 miles from his home.

Start Quote

Someone potentially knows exactly how David died”

End Quote Det Ch Insp Nigel Costello North Yorkshire Police

"North Yorkshire Police seek to review unexplained deaths in their area to see whether any new information or advances in forensic science can help us solve them and bring closure for the family of the deceased," he added.

"Someone potentially knows exactly how David died. Due to the passage of time we believe there may be people out there who may now find it easier to come to the police with any information they may have.

"I would appeal to these people to come forward and pass that information on. Please think of the family of David Hall and how you could provide the missing piece of the jigsaw so that they can grieve properly."

Mr Hall, a council worker, lived in the Gilbridge area of Sunderland.

Described as a "happy-go-lucky" person, he was last seen alive on the evening of 5 August 1987 when he visited an ex-girlfriend in staff accommodation at Sunderland General Hospital.

Anyone with information which could help the inquiry is asked to contact North Yorkshire Police.

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