Northern Ireland

Edward Daly: Tributes paid to 'people's bishop'

Bishop Edward Daly Image copyright PAcemaker
Image caption Edward Daly became famous for the picture of him waving a bloodied handkerchief as the dying Jackie Duddy was carried away on Bloody Sunday

Tributes have been pouring in for the former Bishop of Derry Edward Daly, who has died at the age of 82.

Catholic Primate Archbishop Eamon Martin of Armagh

"He truly lived and proclaimed the Good News of Jesus Christ and, in doing so, became a role model for all of us.

"As a gifted spiritual leader and communicator, his words touched the hearts of many people, but his ministry was not confined to preaching.

"He walked with his people in their struggles and joys and was most at home out in the streets, parishes and communities of his diocese."

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Bishop Donal McKeown of Derry

"Bishop Daly provided an example of priestly ministry which was exemplary, inspired by service of God and the people he encountered.

"His ministry was characterised by his deep love of the people of this diocese, his dedicated visitation of parishes and his constant availability to others.

"The bishops, priests and people of the diocese were blessed to have such a dedicated and faithful priest among them."

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Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness

"He was a tremendous force for good throughout the city.

"He would have been very critical of the IRA throughout the 25-year-old conflict. I can understand that as a bishop of a religious order and of a city.

"He was entitled to have an opinion and he was critical of anyone that was involved in the conflict. But, that said at the same time, he was always willing to have conversations about that, he was always willing to look at people's point of view."

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First Minister Arlene Foster

"Bishop Daly's passing will be felt most acutely by those he served tirelessly for almost 40 years.

"Bishop Daly devoted his life to serving and helping others, quietly undertaking a wide range of charitable works in the local community.

"During the darker moments of our recent past Dr Daly made a significant contribution by arguing that violence should be rejected and by articulating a vision based on respect and tolerance."

Image copyright Reuters

SDLP leader Colum Eastwood

"Edward Daly was truly the people's bishop.

"For many outside of Derry, their memory of Bishop Daly will always lie in the iconic image captured on Bloody Sunday. That singular moment captured the man's compassion and courage in the face of violence. It was and remains an image which told the story of his life's work.

"For the people of Derry though, Bishop Daly was iconic for so much more. Our memory will be of a man of many more images not just one."

Image copyright Pacemaker

Northern Ireland Secretary James Brokenshire

"Throughout his long career, he witnessed at first hand many tragedies of the Northern Ireland troubles, but his priority was always to his parishioners, and he was a constant champion of the people of the north west.

"He was an iconic figure in civic life, and he will long be remembered as a cleric who worked tirelessly to promote peace for all.

"I extend my sincere condolences to his entire family circle."

Image copyright Press Eye

Irish Foreign Minister Charlie Flanagan

"As well as being a man of God, Bishop Daly was first and foremost a man of peace.

"He was a key advocate for peace in Northern Ireland over a period of decades. As a pastor in Derry, he strove to heal a divided city.

"He will be greatly missed by all who knew him, but particularly by the people of Derry."

Image copyright Pacemaker

Kay Duddy, sister of Bloody Sunday victim Jackie Duddy

"He was such a special friend to us, to our family particularly, but not just to our family, but to the whole of this town.

"He was a stalwart throughout his whole life and he did everything he could to help everyone he could.

"For us particularly, for Bloody Sunday, it was such a comfort to know that he was with Jackie in his dying moments."

Image copyright PA

Journalist Peter Taylor

"What stands out about Bishop Daly is that he was a towering figure throughout this incredibly traumatic period that we've all lived through.

"I trusted him 100% and I'm privileged to say he also trusted me which meant that at various highly sensitive times in the course of the so-called Troubles I could go to him for guidance, corroboration and direction.

"Some of the things I was able to discuss with him, and he with me, were extremely sensitive."

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Alliance Party deputy leader Naomi Long

"Whilst many will immediately recall the iconic image of him assisting Jackie Duddy on Bloody Sunday, it was only one example of his courage in standing against violence from whatever source throughout the Troubles.

"His work in the 1980s with Church of Ireland Bishop, James Mehaffey, bringing people in the dioceses together to stand against violence has left a lasting legacy in the city to this day, for which both men were recognised only a year ago."

Pat Hume, wife of former SDLP leader John Hume

"He loved the people of Derry and they so loved him and during John's darkest days he knew he could talk to Bishop Daly, he could confide in Bishop Daly.

"That was so necessary at some of those dark, dark moments. In losing Bishop Daly today we have lost such a dear friend.

"Bishop Daly so appreciated the people of Derry, he loved their sense of humour. He admired their tenacity, he admired and empathised with their struggle for justice and he is such a loss to our community."

Bishop Philip Boyce of Raphoe

"Bishop Edward's attention - at times heroic - to victims of the Troubles in Northern Ireland, for prisoners and their families, and for all who suffered in any way, was remarkable.

"Even in his years of retirement, he gave generous service to the diocese, both in its archives and in his role as the ever-popular and compassionate chaplain to the Foyle Hospice in Derry."

Image copyright Diocese of Raphoe