Scotland

Scottish Wildlife Trust calls for lynx reintroduction

Eurasion Lynx Image copyright Thinkstock
Image caption The lynx is found in western Europe, Russia and central Asia

The Scottish Wildlife Trust has called for the reintroduction of the lynx to Scotland.

The charity said there was a "moral and ecological" case for the return of the once native Eurasian lynx.

The animal was hunted to extinction in the UK hundreds of years ago.

The wildlife trust believes the reintroduction of predators like the lynx would help restore balance in Scotland's natural ecosystems.

The lynx is the third largest predator in Europe, after the brown bear and the wolf.

It can currently be found in the forests of western Europe, Russia and central Asia.

'Right locations'

Jonny Hughes, the Scottish Wildlife Trust's chief executive, said: "The Scottish Wildlife Trust has experience in bringing keystone species back to Scotland, having been a lead partner in the ground-breaking Scottish Beaver Trial, a trial reintroduction of the Eurasian beaver to Argyll.

"We believe that lynx should also be considered for reintroduction and in many ways could be a flagship for the restoration of native habitats, particularly woodlands, into the future."

He added: "Finding the right locations will be one of the major challenges for a potential lynx project and there will be a range of stakeholders who will need to work in partnership to ensure the best chance of success and support, as has been the case in the Scottish Beaver Trial.

"It is important that we all understand the potential benefits of bringing back the lynx to our woodland ecosystems, but also to our forestry and tourism industries.

"At the same time we should understand the challenges that this beautiful once-native cat will bring with it."

Earlier this year, conservation charity Trees for Life and writer George Monbiot promoted the reinstatement of the Eurasian lynx to Scotland.

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