Scotland

The papers: Call to end child funeral charge

The Scotsman leads with a call by oppositions parties for the Scottish government to take action to end fees for the burial of children. The paper says nine Scottish local authorities will be the last in the UK to charge parents after Theresa May said the practice would end in England.

A think-tank's radical suggestion for ending inequality features on the front page of the Herald. The Institute for Public Policy Research says Britain should sell off assets - including its stake in RBS - and hand £10,000 to everyone in the country when the turn 25.

The National leads with Eddie Izzard calling for Labour to "stamp out the stain of anti-Semitism" found in a "minority" of members.

The Daily Record has a story about a stalking case.

The Scottish Sun reports on hit-and-run school girl Roisin Walker taking her first steps after being knocked down in Castlemilk in Glasgow.

Dangerous dogs account for about four complaints to Dundee City Council every week, says the Courier.

A group of residents living close to an Aberdeen Bypass construction site have voiced fears about flood prevention, says the Press and Journal.

"A nation hooked on powerful painkillers" is the headline on the front page of the Scottish Daily Mail. The paper says the number of prescriptions for powerful painkillers has risen by more than a million in a decade.

The Scottish Daily Express says Police Scotland is facing a major review by MSPs, five years after eight regional forces merged into the single one.

The Daily Telegraph has a snow warning to drivers heading home after the Easter break.

A postcode lottery in school standards across Scotland has been exposed by analysis of performance between education departments, says the Times.

The i leads with the Labour anti-Semitism row. The paper reports that Labour has promised to expel any activists who post racist comments on Facebook groups.

The Daily Star of Scotland reports on Declan Donnelly planning a television tribute to his colleague Ant McPartlin.

Related Internet links

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites