Scotland's papers: 'Lifeline' wages deal extended and virus 'cover-up' denied

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The Herald
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Several of the papers lead on the extension of the UK government's furlough wages scheme for workers. However, they are split on just how good a deal it is. The Herald says business leaders have warned that asking employers to contribute to furloughed staff wages risks creating redundancies rather than saving jobs.
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The Daily Record also focuses on the announcement that the UK government will only pay 60% of wages rather 80% after July, with the warning from opposition parties that there is "a very real risk of mass redundancies".
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The Scottish Daily Express takes a different view, saying Chancellor Rishi Sunak gave a "lifeline" to affected workers with his announcement. The paper says the extension of the furlough system will "shield" workers from the threat of redundancy.
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The Press and Journal also describes the furlough extension as a "wages lifeline" for workers, but says fears remain over North Sea oil and gas jobs.
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"No summer cliff edge for 7.5 million workers" is the i's take, referring to previous fears that the scheme could have been abruptly withdrawn. The paper notes that the plan - intended to prevent mass redundancies next month, when it was originally due to end - has been welcomed by Labour and unions.
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The other major story leading Scotland's papers focuses on the fall-out from a BBC Scotland Disclosure investigation in which scientists claimed thousands of lives could have been saved if Scotland had gone into coronavirus lockdown earlier. The Times leads with First Minister Nicola Sturgeon denying there was a cover-up after the government failed to reveal there had been a coronavirus outbreak in Edinburgh a month before restrictions were put in place.
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The National leads with Ms Sturgeon dismissing claims of a coronavirus cover-up as "highly politicised nonsense". Elsewhere in the paper, columnist Kevin McKenna says Prime Minister Boris Johnson's virus strategy is a huge boost for the Scottish independence movement.
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The Daily Telegraph also features Ms Sturgeon's denial of a Covid-19 cover-up. But it leads with its own investigation in which it says the cost of the pandemic to the Exchequer could reach almost £300bn this year. The paper says it has seen a confidential Treasury document which sets out a proposed package of tax increases and spending reductions that may have to be announced within weeks to "enhance credibility and boost investor confidence" in the economy.
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The Scotsman leads with charities calling for an urgent plan from the Scottish government to safely restart cancer services. The coronavirus pandemic has stopped breast, cervical, bowel and other cancer screening programmes, with urgent referrals for diagnosis dropping sharply.
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The Daily Mail says that, in a "blow to millions" of people, families have been told by the UK government that it is unlikely they will be able to go abroad on holiday this summer.
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The Scottish Daily Star leads with a doctor from Glasgow winning £500,000 on the ITV game show Who Wants To Be A Millionaire. Andrew Townsley, who has multiple sclerosis, says he plans to spend some of the money on a round-the-world trip of a lifetime.
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The Edinburgh News leads with a reader-inspired campaign, calling for the first minister to ease lockdown restrictions to allow family reunions.
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The Courier leads with the Dundee family of a local football coach telling of their heartbreak after he died from coronavirus at the age of 55.
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The Glasgow Times has an investigation into how gangs in the city are using code words to sell drugs online.
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The Evening Telegraph leads with neighbours telling of their shock after a safe, which had £14,000 worth of heroin inside, was thrown out of a flat window in Dundee.

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