Scotland's papers: 'Carnage in Kabul' as refugees die in blasts

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The twin bomb attacks at Kabul airport, which targeted people trying to flee the country after the Taliban takeover, features across the front pages. The Scotsman says the Islamic State group claimed responsibility for the blasts. It is thought more than 60 people died and another 140 were injured.
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The Herald says Boris Johnson has confirmed the UK will continue with its withdrawal and evacuation efforts in Afghanistan despite the terror attacks. He also confirmed that US troops were among those killed when two suicide bombs were detonated. The paper adds that no British soldiers are reported to have been injured.
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The Metro carries a photograph which also appears in many other papers showing two distraught women, with their faces bloodied, after their arrival at a hospital.
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The Daily Telegraph says it was "America's deadliest day in a decade" after at least 90 people, including 13 US troops, died in the attack claimed by a wing of the Islamic State group. The explosions threw the final hours of international airlifts from Kabul airport into chaos, adds the paper.
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The Sun carries the headline "Hell on Earth". Its story mentions the crowds of people who had been outside the airport in the hours before the attack - including a family who have been granted British passports and were hoping to join relatives in the UK.
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Refugees and US Marines were murdered side by side, says the i. The paper adds that the UK and US will continue with the airlifts but the final British flight from Kabul could depart on Friday.
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The Daily Mail says the attacks triggered fresh condemnation of Joe Biden's decision to remove US troops from Afghanistan. Its headline suggests the events were the "tragic price of surrender" - noting that the US president justified the withdrawal to spare the lives of American troops.
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The US president is facing his "darkest hour", says the Daily Express. Eleven Marines and a navy medic have been confirmed among the dead.
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The Times reports the deaths alongside a photo showing victims being carried from the scene. It says the blasts were also a "severe setback" for the Taliban who pledged to keep the country clear of terror attacks. In another story, the Times reports on claims that the contact details of Afghans who worked for the UK were left in the abandoned British embassy compound.
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The National features a picture of injured people being taken away from Kabul airport after the blasts. But it leads with the SNP's leader at Westminster, Ian Blackford, saying the party has a "responsibility" to Scottish voters to deliver a second independence referendum in the current Holyrood parliament.
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The Daily Star also reports the Kabul bombing on its front page. However, its main story focuses on Britain's lorry drivers - and a row over a shortage of toilet facilities.
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The Press and Journal leads with a report which shows that more than 20,000 residents in the Highlands contacted the Citizens Advice Bureau last year with concerns about issues including spiralling debts. It comes as the UK government is set to withdraw the extra £20-a-week Universal Credit payment which it introduced to help people struggling during the pandemic.
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The Courier leads with drivers of electrical vehicles complaining after technical problems at a service centre in Dundee led to large parts of Scotland's charging network being shut down.
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The Evening Express says it is celebration time as custard is set to return to Aberdeenshire school menus following a petition from pupils.
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The Edinburgh Evening News says an investigation has been launched after new evidence emerged over the burning of 70 memorial benches by council workers.
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The Evening Telegraph leads with a drug dealer claiming police over-valued a stash of drugs which he was caught with.
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The Glasgow Times focuses on an MP warning that families in the city will need to make a choice between "heating or eating" this winter as thousands are expected to suffer from a looming cut to Universal Credit.

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