Scotland's papers: Vaccine passports' red card and 'cold caller queen'

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The Scottish Sun on Sunday
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The Scottish government's proposals for a vaccine passport scheme get the red card in the Sunday Mail. The paper reports that the SFA and the SPFL have asked clubs to lobby MSPs into kicking out the plan. The paper says clubs have "logistical and practical" concerns over the scheme which was announced earlier in the week.
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The Scottish Sunday Express says Scottish Labour is preparing to vote against the disputed vaccine passport scheme which would require people to show proof of full vaccination status before attending large gatherings like football games and concerts. MSPs are due to vote on the issue on Thursday and the paper reports that the Lib Dems are also "likely" to oppose it.
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This week's Herald on Sunday leads with a leaked report which says the SNP must reveal how it plans to spend fundraised cash following a police probe into claims it diverted £600,000 of referendum funds elsewhere. The paper has obtained an internal governance report which it claims recommends that the party improves its financial transparency and appoints a new scrutiny committee to "restore confidence" in SNP procedures.
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The SNP leadership of Scotland's biggest council hits back at Labour critics in the Sunday National as pressure over performance continues. The paper investigates claims critics of Glasgow City Council's ruling party are trying to "derail" its first pro-independence administration.
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An exclusive in the Scotland on Sunday claims that the flagship venues for the upcoming COP26 climate change summit - the SEC and the Armadillo - have received the second lowest possible rating for energy efficiency, with work yet to commence on a raft of legally-binding improvements issued by assessors in order to reduce CO2 emissions.
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The Sunday Mail reveals the social media "influencer" behind a Scottish company fined for making nuisance calls. The paper reports that Dial A Deal Scotland made more than half a million unwanted cold calls. One of its owners is Yvonne McCuaig, who promotes her luxury lifestyle on Instagram.
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The front page of the Sunday Post includes a story claiming the NHS is looking at a £1.5m computer system which will allow GPs to see more patients online and reduce face-to-face appointments. The paper says firms were asked to tender for the tech contract last week "days after" the health secretary pledged to bring back in-person appointments as soon as possible.
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The Sunday Times reveals that an aide to the Prince of Wales resigned on Saturday following claims he had arranged an honour for a Saudi tycoon who donated more than £1.5m to royal charities. It reports that Michael Fawcett stood down temporarily as chief executive of The Prince's Foundation, and alleges that Mahfouz Marei Mubarak bin Mahfouz paid thousands of pounds to people with links to Prince Charles who told the Saudi businessman they could secure an honour. He was awarded the CBE in 2016 and has denied any wrongdoing.
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The same story is the lead in the Scottish Mail on Sunday which claims that Mr Fawcett said in a letter that the charity would be "happy and willing" to use its influence to help the Saudi tycoon. The newspaper describes Mr Fawcett as "arguably the prince's most trusted aide".
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And the Sunday Telegraph writes that the prime minister is facing unrest within his party over proposals to raise national insurance, a move which has been labelled "idiotic" by senior Conservative figures. The paper says that Boris Johnson could insist that the increase is vital to save the NHS and that he will try to justify the increase as necessary to clear the backlog of patients on hospital waiting lists. But MPs within his own party have warned that it will result in younger workers subsidising care for older people.

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