Glasgow & West Scotland

Vodka row killer publican jailed

William Auld
Image caption William Auld died after being repeatedly stabbed

A pub manager who stabbed a drinker to death in his Glasgow bar has been jailed for a minimum of 18 years.

John McCarron, 42, was convicted of murdering 45-year-old William Auld at the Cavendish Bar, in the city's Nitshill area, on 3 January this year.

The High Court in Glasgow heard how the attack happened following a row over a bottle of vodka.

The Cavendish Bar was the first pub in Glasgow to have its licence suspended for a year after the killing.

The court heard how the attack happened at the bar that McCarron had run for eight years.

A row broke out around closing time when the girlfriend of Mr Auld's son tried to buy a bottle of vodka.

'Vicious attack'

Mr Auld tried to calm the situation down but McCarron raced from behind the bar armed with a knife.

He then repeatedly stabbed Mr Auld in front of other drinkers, resulting in his death.

McCarron claimed during his trial that he had gone to remove Mr Auld from the bar as he believed he had been the "aggressor".

He told the jury that the only time he handled a knife that evening was when he had confiscated one from a man who had visited his bar.

The court was also shown pictures of an array of weapons found at the pub, including a baseball bat, machete and a hammer.

McCarron said some of them had been "lying about for years" and that the machete was used to remove old mop heads.

The jury, however, convicted him of murder following a two-week trial.

Passing sentence, judge Sean Murphy QC told McCarron: "You have been convicted of carrying out what was a vicious attack involving a lethal weapon.

"This had a tragic impact on the family of the deceased Mr Auld.

"The dispute which arose between you and Mr Auld over the sale of a bottle of vodka was the kind of situation which someone like you, with experience in the licence trade, should have been able to deal with."

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