Wales

Cadair Idris oak chair is presented to the Eden Project

Grace, three, tries out the chair at its new location
Image caption Grace, three, tries out the chair at its new location

A large oak chair, which was removed from a mountain in Snowdonia, has a new home - in Cornwall.

South African craftsman Nick Bullen left the 8ft (2.43m) chair on Cadair Idris as a thank you to the community.

But conservation bodies were worried it would set a precedent as they are contacted regularly by people wanting to donate memorial benches and plaques.

Now it has been presented to the Eden Project, which called it a "beautiful gift".

It had taken 15 people four hours to carry the chair close to the 893m (2,930ft) summit in November.

Both the Snowdonia National Park and Countryside Council for Wales said allowing the chair to stay would set a "dangerous precedent", as they were contacted regularly by people wanting to donate memorial benches and plaques.

There was also concern it might topple over in high winds.

Mr Bullen, who was returning to South Africa, said there were "no hard feelings".

The seat has been given a spot at the Wild Cornwall area of the Eden Project eco-attraction near St Austell overlooking the Biomes plant houses.

Diana Mullis, of the Eden Project, said: "Wild Cornwall will be the perfect spot to put this beautiful gift.

"The tale of the chair adds to the rich history of folklore, story-telling and the spoken word here at Eden, as well as providing a quiet place for people to sit and reflect."

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