North West Wales

Call to grass over pier pavilion site in Llandudno

The site of the former pier pavilion (picture David Roberts)
Image caption The site of the former pier pavilion at Llandudno

A call has been made for the derelict pier pavilion site on Llandudno seafront to be grassed over if it cannot be redeveloped.

Conwy councillors will discuss the site, which was damaged by fire in 1994, and now a hole in the ground with the remains of the building's supports.

David Williams of Llandudno Hospitality Association wants it bulldozed and grassed if no use can be found for it.

Councillors will be asked to support making redevelopment a priority.

In his report Robert Dix, the head of community development services with Conwy council, notes the site occupies a "key location" within the resort of Llandudno.

At the time of the fire there was planning permission to restore the building for re-use.

Since then however, although there has been some interest, nothing has been done with the site.

The site is listed, and is within the town's conservation area next to the Grand Hotel, which is also listed.

Image caption The building was damaged in a fire in 1994

Mr Dix notes that even to clear the site would require listed building consent from the Welsh heritage body Cadw.

Because of this, and the fact the site is privately owned, the council has limited itself to "periodic tidying of the site and vermin control" - with the bill is then sent to the owner, he said.

'Problematic'

"Discussions between the site owner and a number of interested parties failed to result in any scheme being submitted for planning permission/listed building consent," said Mr Dix.

A study also failed to get a developer on board, but identified it as suitable for tourism or leisure use.

"A number of interested parties were identified, but none at that time (2004/05) could agree terms with the site owner, who appeared to be seeking 'residential value' for the site," he added.

Mr Williams said Llandudno Hospitality Association accepted that because of modern building costs any new building would not be the same as the Victorian one, but would have to be "sympathetic" to its surrounding.

Because of the problems associated with the site Mr Williams said the association had also accepted that any development would have to include "domestic property", which would possibly be penthouse apartments.

"We have no objection to this as there has to be an income, and there is also a need of car parking because there is none at the site," he said.

Mr Williams added: "It they can't find anything to do with it I'd rather they bulldoze the site and grass it over, as it's currently a hole in the ground where people throw rubbish."

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