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Egypt media celebrate Sisi victory

Front pages of a selection of Egyptian papers Image copyright other
Image caption The president-elect and celebrating crowds cover the front pages of the dailies

Most broadcast media in Egypt celebrated former Defence Minister Abdul Fattah al-Sisi's landslide win in the country's presidential election.

The result, however, was rejected by TV stations aligned with the banned Muslim Brotherhood, which had encouraged its supporters to boycott the poll.

Egyptian newspapers were also mainly jubilant, with front pages featuring photos of the newly-elected president and celebrating crowds.

'New tsar'

Both state-run and privately-owned television channels were in a celebratory mood throughout the night as the election results were declared.

Sada al-Balad, a privately-owned TV channel, was particularly exuberant, with presenter Ahmad Moussa hosting a party inside the channel's studio, complete with famous singers and the raising of Egypt's flag.

Privately-owned ON TV also got into the spirit, airing shots of celebrations from various locations around the Egyptian capital. Tempering its tone during a discussion programme on the channel, one pundit warned against Mr Sisi becoming a "new tsar who needs people to tell him that he is mortal".

More reserved were the state-run Channel One and Nile News, which hosted joint coverage of the election results. While both channels aired footage of joyous Cairo residents, there was also a studio discussion on the challenges lying in wait for the victor.

By contrast, pro-Muslim Brotherhood channels rejected what they called "illegitimate" elections. Rabia TV said the poll was a "farce", claiming that the turnout was only 10%. Al-Sharq, another pro-Brotherhood channel, aired nothing but the words "Boycotting the play".

'It's settled'

Egypt's print media, which on Wednesday had been critical of the decision to extend the voting to a third day amid fears of a low turnout, was largely unanimous in its praise for the winner and the conduct of the poll.

"It has been settled - Al-Sisi is in the palace," the privately-owned Al-Tahrir newspaper said on its front page alongside a photograph of the newly-elected president.

State-owned daily Al-Jumhuriyah carried a similar headline reading: "The president at the palace's doorstep", along with pictures of people celebrating.

State-owned Ahram Massay also featured a large image of the election winner, this time sitting in a presidential pose below the headline "Abdul Fattah al-Sisi is Egypt's president."

Celebrations were highlighted by the state-owned daily Al-Akhbar. "Egypt celebrates the president's election," reads the paper's headline, with a picture captioned "Egyptians celebrate the election of the first democratic president through the ballot box".  

The liberal daily Al-Wafd reported on its front page: "Thanks to everyone who took part in the voting, organisation, security."

The pro-Brotherhood media, on the other, celebrated the relatively low turnout as a show of defiance by Egyptians. "In a fantastic response, 90% of the Egyptian people boycotted the bloodstained presidential election and, hence, appreciation is due," the Brotherhood's Ikhwanonline website said.

'End of dark era'

Opinion on the election outcome was mixed among Egypt's social media users.

Hailing Sisi's success, TV presenter Jihan Mansour tweeted in Arabic: "Many congratulations to Egypt on President Al-Sisi's victory in the presidential election and hard luck to the chivalrous Hamdin Sabahi; Egypt ends the Brotherhood's dark era!"

Mr Sisi's success was not universally praised on social media. Popular blogger Ahmad Badawi tweeted in Arabic: "A field marshal without a war; a president without election; a candidate without a platform is only appropriate for a country without a law and people without a future."

BBC Monitoring reports and analyses news from TV, radio, web and print media around the world. For more reports from BBC Monitoring, click here. You can follow BBC Monitoring on Twitter and Facebook.

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