In pictures: Ghana's 'masquerade clubs'

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Image source, Suzanne Vanhooymissen
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More than 1,000 people lined the streets to celebrate Easter in Ghana's small port city of Sekondi, which is a key hub for the country's burgeoning oil sector.
Image source, Suzanne Vanhooymissen
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Each participant wears a specially tailored costume, with the designs for each club kept top secret until their first public showing.
Image source, Suzanne Vanhooymissen
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At Christmas there are competitions for the best costumes, music and dancing skills, but at Easter the mood is more relaxed and the rivalry less fierce.
Image source, Suzanne Vanhooymissen
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The clubs are an important part of community life, providing a safety net for members who may face financial difficulties from unemployment or funeral costs.
Image source, Suzanne Vanhooymissen
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The clubs are open to everyone, whatever their age. Some even offer scholarships for their top students, so that they continue into higher education.
Image source, Suzanne Vanhooymissen
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Traditional Raffia masks are facing competition from Western-style masks, which some people prefer because they are "scarier".
Image source, Suzanne Vanhooymissen
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Joshua Boating has designed 400 costumes in the past eight months. But he is not giving himself a break anytime soon. "After Easter I will start working on next year's costumes," he says.
Image source, Suzanne Vanhooymissen
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The appropriately named "Oil City" is Sekondi's biggest club, with 750 members. The others are "Yankey", "Spain", "Iron Fighters", "Chinese", "Yanta Boys" and "Justice".
Image source, Suzanne Vanhooymissen
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The group's popularity is all down to its head drummer, Steven Abednego Insiadoo. Or so says his sister Richlove: “He's the best drummer in town, everyone wants to be part of his club.”
Image source, Suzanne Vanhooymissen
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Stilt-walkers are highly sought after, giving clubs an easily recognisable mascot for their parades.
Image source, Suzanne Vanhooymissen
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Here he is again, in an unconventional "between the legs shot".
Image source, Suzanne Vanhooymissen
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With temperatures up to 35C, many put talcum powder on their faces to stop them sweating too much under their masks.

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