Thais honour late King Bhumibol Adulyadej with tattoos

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Image source, Wasawat Lukharang
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Tattooists in Thailand have been busy since King Bhumibol Adulyadej died on 13 October, with many people wanting to pay tribute to the king in ink.
Image source, Wasawat Lukharang
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BBC Thai photographer Wasawat Lukharang visited two tattoo parlours in the Thai capital Bangkok.
Image source, Wasawat Lukharang
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Many customers have asked for a tattoo declaring they were "born in the reign of King Rama IX", as the king was also known. Most Thais have known no other monarch and King Bhumibol was seen as an anchor of stability in a country that has seen no shortage of turbulent politics.
Image source, Wasawat Lukharang
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King Bhumibol was widely revered in Thailand, and ruled for 70 years. His son, Crown Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn, is heir apparent, but it is unclear when he will take the throne.
Image source, Wasawat Lukharang
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Thais are currently deep in mourning. The country has strict lese majeste laws that make it illegal to insult, defame or threaten the most senior members of the royal family.
Image source, Wasawat Lukharang
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Tattooists on Sukhumvit Road and in the Siam Shopping Center said men and women of all ages had come in asking for tattoos in honour of the late king. Some had never been tattooed before.
Image source, Wasawat Lukharang
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The tattoos cost up to 1,000 Thai baht (£23). This one reads: "I pledge to be your subject in every life".
Image source, Wasawat Lukharang
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Some parlours have been charging nine or 99 Thai baht for tattoos honouring the king, who was the ninth Thai monarch from the Chakri dynasty.
Image source, Wasawat Lukharang
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Some well-known actors had posted pictures of their tattoos honouring the king online, which sent many people to a particular parlour on Sukhumvit Road.
Image source, Wasawat Lukharang
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This tattoo speaks of doing "good deeds for the father", referring to the late king.
Image source, Wasawat Lukharang
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Customers told the BBC that they wanted to "do something" for the king. This tattoo shows the numeral 9 in the Thai language.