Asia-Pacific

Kyrgyzstan parties agree vote recount

Kyrgyz election committee count ballots at a polling station in Bishkek
Image caption The poll was held under a new constitution intended to make the country a parliamentary democracy

Ballot papers are to be recounted in Kyrgyzstan's first parliamentary poll.

The five parties that won seats in the new parliament agreed to a recount after a sixth party argued it had also made the 5% mark needed to gain seats.

The election failed to produce a clear winner, which means parties will have to form a coalition government.

The vote follows months of political turmoil after the ousting of President Kurmanbek Bakiyev in a mass uprising in April.

The country also witnessed bloody clashes in the south between Kyrgyz majority and ethnic Uzbeks, in which at least 400 died.

In June a new constitution introducing a parliamentary system was approved in a referendum.

Kyrgyzstan is trying to build the first parliamentary democracy in Central Asia, which is dominated by post-Soviet era stongmen.

Coalition cabinet

Five out of 29 parties passed the threshold to win seats in the new parliament, but none won enough to form a government.

But the opposition Butun Kyrgyzstan party, which came sixth but failed to win a minimum 5% of the vote, called for a recount, citing problems with the automated counting system and human error.

Results are expected in one or two days, Kyrgyz media reported.

The opposition hardline nationalist party Ata Zhurt narrowly won the election with 8.8% of the vote.

It has strong backing in the south among ethnic Kyrgyz and wants to go back to a presidential form of government.

On Tuesday it called for a broad coalition to avert political chaos but analysts say divisions between the successful parties may make forming a government difficult.

Second was the pro-government Social Democrats, whose leader was one of the top members of Kyrgyzstan's provisional government that came to power in April.

More than 60% of voters in Sunday's election cast ballots for 24 other parties that failed to secure seats.

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