In pictures: Banksy hits Paris streets for first time

  • Published
A man takes photographs of a recent artwork believed to be attributed to Banksy showing a rat wearing a Minnie Mouse bow under "May 1968" in the Sorbonne neighbourhoodImage source, EPA
Image caption,
A few of the images, like this one found in the Sorbonne neighbourhood, are seen as tribute to the May 1968 student uprising that shocked France. It has been read as a dig at the decline of French revolutionary spirit. His trademark rat wearing a Minnie Mouse bow also alludes to Disneyland Paris theme park, which has become one of the capital's biggest employers.
A man walks past a recent artwork by street artist Banksy in ParisImage source, AFP
Image caption,
Standing by a pile of blankets and a teddy bear, this young black girl painting over a swastika has been seen to reflect the growing numbers of refugees who are sleeping rough along the River Seine. It was found shortly after World Refugee Day on 20 June, near a migrant centre that was closed down in March. It has since been defaced with bright blue paint.
Image source, EPA
Image caption,
This black-and-white etch of a veiled figure in mourning sits on a side street behind the Bataclan concert hall, where 89 people were killed by Islamist terrorists in November 2015.
Image source, EPA
Image caption,
Banksy reworked a famous painting by Jacques-Louis David of French emperor Napoleon crossing the Alps on horseback with a red headscarf wrapped tightly around his face. This has been seen as an apparent reference to France's 2010 ban on face coverings in public - most notably the niqab worn by Muslim women. The iconic 19th Century French image is in one of Paris's most ethnically diverse northern neighbourhoods.
Image source, EPA
Image caption,
A businessman or politician in a suit offers a dog a bone after having sawn off its leg. Found at the Sorbonne University, this is seen as a dig at capitalism and greed in general. Banksy's work has sold for more than $1m at auction and fans have already covered some of the new Paris works with clear acrylic to protect them.