Isle Of Man / Ellan Vannin

World Tin Bath Championships held in Castletown

World Tin Bath Races
Image caption More than 80 competitors entered their customised tin baths in the World Tin Bath Championships.
Lee Cain
Image caption Lee Cain beat around 50 men to claim the world title after a commanding victory in Castletown harbour.
Erica Cowen
Image caption Erica Cowen finished ahead of around 30 ladies to seal her 15th women's world title.
World Tin Bath Races
Image caption About 1,000 spectators surrounded the harbour to watch the spectacle.
World Tin Bath Races
Image caption The winner is the first to reach the finish line or the person who covers the furthest distance without sinking
World Tin Bath Races
Image caption A range of other water based activities were held to entertain the crowds.

The 42nd annual World Tin Bath championships on the Isle of Man have raised more than £6,000 for local charities, said organisers.

Hundreds of spectators crowded around Castletown's harbour to watch competitors paddle for glory in their individually decorated tin baths.

Previous winner Lee Cain won the men's race, while Erica Cowen clinched her 15th women's world title.

Competitors use tin baths like small paddle boats in the event.

The winner is the first to reach the finish line of the 400m course or the person who covers the furthest distance without sinking.

'Granny's fire'

More than 80 competitors from the Isle of Man, the UK, Europe and even the United States took part.

Organiser David Collister said admission to the event had raised more than £6,000 and added that the figure could increase through sponsorship.

He said: "People just like to have fun and the spectators come because they like to see people get wet and they like to see people sink.

"It's two hours of family fun and slapstick entertainment involving household tin baths that your granny will have used in front of the fire."

Garret Jones had the dubious honour of being the first person to sink whilst the RNLI entry, the Sir William Hillary, was voted the best design.

The snake race, in which teams of six sit backwards on inflated tubes and paddle with arms and legs to reach the finish line, was won by the Southern Young Farmers.

The event, which attracts huge crowds, has been running since 1971 and recently featured in the Daily Telegraph's top ten weirdest festivals to attend in July, ranking alongside Cornwall's Nudefest and Finland's Wife Carrying World Championships.

More on this story

Related Internet links

The BBC is not responsible for the content of external Internet sites