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Robert Frank: Influential Swiss-American photographer dies at 94

Photographer Robert Frank attends the opening of "Robert Frank, Books And Films, 1947 - 2016" at The Tisch Galleries on 28 January 2016 in New York City. Image copyright Getty Images

Robert Frank, one of the most influential photographers of the 20th Century, has died at the age of 94.

Frank, who was born in Switzerland but emigrated to the United States in 1947, was best known for his work The Americans - a book which chronicled his 10,000-mile journey across America at the height of the Cold War,

First published in France and then in the US. It was widely condemned by critics, as it depicted a country sharply at odds with the America portrayed by Hollywood and the ad men.

Earl A Powell III, art historian and museum director, said the work showed "a people plagued by racism, often ill-served by their politicians, intoxicated with the media and celebrities, and infatuated with speed, movement, and even the road itself".

People look at rare Robert Frank photographs from his book "The Americans" at Sotheby's on 17 December 2015 in New York City. Image copyright Getty Images

Frank shot on a small 35mm camera without a motor, so unlike today where you'd find near identical frames sides by side, his contact sheets reveal how he has moved through the crowd, seizing moments of interest.

Ultimately, The Americans is a book that flows from front to back, a visual poem where sequencing was all important.

Enlarged contact sheets from photographer Robert Frank's groundbreaking book "The Americans" at Blue Sky Gallery in Portland, Oregon, USA. Image copyright Alamy
Image caption Contact sheets from The Americans
Parade - Hoboken, New Jersey, 1955 Image copyright Robert Frank courtesy Pace/MacGill
Image caption Parade - Hoboken, New Jersey, 1955, from The Americans
Trolley - New Orleans, 1955 Image copyright Robert Frank courtesy Pace/MacGill
Image caption Trolley - New Orleans, 1955, from The Americans
Charleston, South Carolina, 1955 Image copyright Robert Frank, courtesy Pace/MacGill
Image caption Charleston, South Carolina, 1955, from The Americans
View from hotel window - Butte, Montana, 1956 Image copyright Robert Frank, courtesy Pace/MacGill
Image caption View from hotel window - Butte, Montana, 1956, from The Americans

Frank's loose style broke the mould. He shot around 28,000 images that were edited down to 83 for a book that rewrote the rules of photo-journalism.

Beat poet Jack Kerouac wrote in the preface to the book's US edition, Frank "sucked a sad poem right out of America on to film."

Frank went on to make a number of films, including a documentary about the Rolling Stones 1972 tour of America which the group banned from being shown as it captured moments of drug taking.

Wales, Ben James, 1953 Image copyright Robert Frank, courtesy Pace/MacGill
Image caption Wales, Ben James, 1953
New York City, 7 Bleecker Street, September, 1993 Image copyright Robert Frank, courtesy Pace/MacGill
Image caption New York City, 7 Bleecker Street, September, 1993

"He never crossed over into celebrity," said photographer Nan Goldin. "He's famous because he made a mark. He collected the world."

Both of his children have passed away, his daughter was killed in a plane crash aged just 20 and his son Pablo took his own life in 1994.

But Frank will be remembered as one of the greatest photographers of the 20th century and beyond.

Robert Frank holding a pre-war Leica camera, 1954 Image copyright Fred Stein Archive/Archive Photos/Getty Images
Image caption Robert Frank holding a pre-war Leica camera, 1954
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