Mike Costello

Athletics and boxing correspondent

Analysis and opinion from our athletics and boxing correspondent

About Mike

Mike has been reporting and commentating on major sporting events... Read more about Mike Costello for the BBC for more than a quarter of a century, most recently as the athletics and boxing correspondent.

He has covered seven Olympic Games and dozens of world title fights in a career that has taken him to 60 countries.

In 2015, he was voted "Broadcast Journalist of the Year" by the Sports Journalists' Association."

Lennox Lewis

'An outrage, a highway robbery'

Read full article on Lennox Lewis v Evander Holyfield 20 years on: 'An outrage, a highway robbery'

On 13 March 1999, Britain's Lennox Lewis fought American Evander Holyfield at New York's Madison Square Garden. The winner would be crowned the 'undisputed' heavyweight champion of the world. The fight finished - controversially - in a draw. Twenty years on, Mike Costello shares his memories.

Back then, only the social media storm was missing.

James DeGale

Hurt DeGale vows to prove me wrong - Costello

Read full article on Mike Costello: James DeGale looking forward to proving me wrong against Chris Eubank Jr

As we get set to mark the 30th anniversary of Frank Bruno's first world heavyweight title showdown against Mike Tyson, one famous line of the BBC's Harry Carpenter commentary that night endures as an example of the dilemma faced by commentators and reporters in a sport in which access to the history-makers is almost unparalleled.

Back in February 1989 at the Las Vegas Hilton, Britain's Bruno answered the bell as a distant second-favourite - and the odds seemed justified when he was floored in the opening seconds of the contest. But in the final minute of the first round, he staggered the American champion with a left hook and Carpenter's rigid devotion to impartiality deserted him.

Deontay Wilder Tyson Fury

Wilder v Fury 'might be start of something special'

Read full article on Wilder v Fury: 'Gypsy King' in peak condition and could cause an upset in LA

The presence of Ricky Hatton in Tyson Fury's corner on Saturday night will serve as an indication of just how far the Gypsy King has travelled in his mission to reshape his mind, his body, his life and his career.

In poundage, Fury has shed the equivalent of a peak-condition, light-welterweight Hatton since returning to training a year ago. And like Hatton, Fury has had to deal with the torment which sometimes besets even those who appear to have it all.

Anthony Joshua & Lennox Lewis

Is the best yet to come from Joshua?

Read full article on Joshua v Parker: Is the best yet to come from Anthony Joshua?

At a news conference in December 2016 to announce Anthony Joshua's showdown against Wladimir Klitschko, the two men posed for photographs and gave interviews on the pitch at Wembley Stadium as notices hanging from chains by the touchline carried the message: 'Where players enter and legends leave'.

Four months later, Joshua and Klitschko resurrected the glamorous image of the heavyweight division on a night which will help define both men forever.

Nicola Adams

Are safety and equality compatible in boxing?

Read full article on Concussion in sport: Are safety and equality compatible in women's boxing?

In a week during which Ireland's Katie Taylor defended her world title and Nicola Adams returns to competitive action, it is timely to consider the dangers faced by female boxers and the indications they are more at risk in the ring than their male counterparts.

Research into other sports has shown female participants are more prone to concussion than men, raising questions as to whether safety and equality are compatible in boxing, and splitting opinion among respected figures.

Mike Tyson, Anthony Joshua and Muhammed Ali

'Joshua wears his crown of thorns well'

Read full article on Anthony Joshua well placed to create sustainable legacy

"The heavyweight championship will drive people crazy. You know that right? It's like a crown of thorns."

In a BBC Radio 5 live boxing podcast earlier this year, Mike Tyson spoke from experience in describing the burdens that come with the glory for the owners of the prize once labelled the richest in sport: "Everyone wants to use you for something. It's like being the President of the United States."