Petra Kvitova column: Wimbledon, 'unusual' arm injury & Melbourne pain

Petra Kvitova column

Two-time Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova, who has won 27 singles title on the WTA Tour, is writing a column for the BBC Sport website during the championships at the All England Club.

The 29-year-old Czech, who has not played since pulling out of the French Open in May with an arm injury, faces Tunisian Ons Jabeur in the first round on Tuesday.

I had some doubts about whether I would play at Wimbledon but my arm is better, which is great.

The tear in my forearm has been an unusual injury - nobody knows how it is going to be and how much time I will need to be ready again.

I had a few MRI scans during the period when I couldn't hit and it didn't show that it's 100% ready but sometimes in our life, nothing is really ready!

I only held a racquet again a few days ago after hurting it the day before my match five weeks ago at the French Open. Before that I couldn't do anything for a couple of weeks and was glad to just do something simple like holding a drink in that hand.

I'm happy that I hit on Saturday and I have no pain. That is really important.

After so many problems I've been through in my life already, which have been well documented, I think I feel my body more and I'm not as risky a person as I was probably before.

I do have my age as well, so sometimes I have to really think about it. But of course, if I do have pain in my arm I won't play. So far it's OK - there's a few more days so anything can happen.

Petra Kvitova in Prague

'It took me a while to get over Australian Open defeat'

Reaching the final at this year's Australian Open in January was a huge result for me. I had a great two weeks in Melbourne.

But losing in the final was so painful. It took me a while to get over it but it was a big motivation to continue the work I had been doing before and how I was getting ready for matches. And I still have that motivation.

Unfortunately I missed the French Open but life is continuing and I am still going to try my best and be prepared for everything.

Winning a Grand Slam or becoming world number one are pretty connected with each other. If you win a Grand Slam, you have a big chance to be world number one.

It would be great if it happened that way for me. Of course, I'm missing the world number one ranking in my career but on the other hand I always was focusing on the tournaments and on the results, especially in the Grand Slams.

Kvitova lost 7-6 (7-2) 5-7 6-4 to Naomi Osaka in January's Australian Open final - her first Grand Slam final since sustaining career-threatening injuries in a knife attack in December 2016
Kvitova lost 7-6 (7-2) 5-7 6-4 to Naomi Osaka in January's Australian Open final - her first Grand Slam final since sustaining career-threatening injuries in a knife attack in December 2016

'I love Wimbledon'

In the past I did used to come here and do things like looking for my name on the winners' board but after so many years on the tour, it's a little bit more familiar.

Of course I love it here, I love this club, I love playing on the grass - it's always very special for me.

When I was growing up in the Czech Republic we played on clay in the summer but in the winter we played indoors where the surface was so fast. I think that's where I have got the game for grass because it was pretty low and pretty fast. So I always played the fast game and not really the clay game.

I do have Wimbledon twice already so it would be great to win another one but Wimbledon is the most famous one. If I win another Grand Slam, it doesn't matter which one.

My expectations here are not really high but maybe this can help me relax more on court. But also, I know from the past that sometimes I don't need to have hit for that many hours to be ready.

Petra Kvitova with the Wimbledon trophy
Kvitova won the Wimbledon singles titles in 2011 and 2014

Petra Kvitova was speaking to BBC Sport's Sonia Oxley

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